Eight things to consider when choosing a sync-and-retarget advertising partner

Jigsaw pieces

Earlier this month we published a piece in VideoNet giving advice to advertisers and media buyers on what they need to know when choosing a sync-and-retarget partner.

Check out the piece here.

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Ads viewability won’t solve the ‘viewed’ problem

The advertising industry is moving further towards setting a standard where ‘viewability’ of ads is concerned. That’s good news. But what does this actually mean for your ads, and the likelihood that they’ll be seen and remembered by your target audience? After all, this is the aim of the game. How far can purchasing viewable impressions go towards helping to solve the issue of getting views for advertisers?

Viewability & why it’s being worked on 
Kermit not seeing

There’s been quite a bit of chatter in the last several months about viewability in online advertising. Basically, it boils down to this: as an advertiser, you may be buying ‘served impressions’ for your campaigns, but that doesn’t mean the opportunity exists for your ad to actually be seen. Your ad, for example, might be served below the fold (so out of view) on a website, or on a fraudulent site where only bots will ‘see’ it, or sometimes if an ad-blocker is in use. According to a study run by Google in 2016, more than half of ads served online never actually got seen. The thing is, ads like these would still have to be paid for as served impressions on a display network. Marketers may well have simply flung half their budgets into a furnace. Recently, however, the problem has begun to be addressed by bodies like the IAB, ANA, MRC and 4A’s, with said organisations working with networks to try to settle on viewability standards. Meaning advertisers can pay for impressions that have a high chance of being seen.

The ‘viewed’ problem, and why it won’t be solved by viewability
Binoculars

So that’s all good news from an advertiser’s perspective, and helps them stand a better chance of having their ads engaged with. But it’s not a guarantee by any means. Having a high viewability rate for your ads does not necessarily translate into actual ROI. Ads, for example, can meet viewability standards but simply be overlooked, or seen but not recalled later. And it’s also possible that, with the adoption of viewability standards, publishers can often feel forced into cramming the upper section of a page with ad-space or face having served impressions that don’t result in monetization for them. This may mean advertisers having more trouble rising above the visual noise, grabbing attention and encouraging recall.

A few ways to deal with it

Long story short – viewable impressions matter and make sense, but are definitely not the end of the road where creating engagement and getting people to view ads  is concerned. Advertisers and media buyers need to remain aware that plenty of other factors remain hovering around, waiting to be given due consideration. Placement and creative type, for example, still matters – viewers scan sites a certain way, paying more attention to specific sections. Context and relevance should still be thought of – native advertising can work well here, and thoughtful targeting (e.g. accurate audience modeling) is irreplaceable. Using in-image or in-stream video can also help improve the chances of gaining the attention of your target audience. And don’t forget about the quality of the creative itself, of course! Ads themselves need to be well put-together and thought out if people are to find them eye-grabbing and compelling.

Seeing the bigger picture

Creating viewability standards is a step forward, but advertisers can’t fall into the myopic  trap of believing that paying for viewable impressions will solve all of their problems and result in waves of clicks and conversions. There’s more to a successful campaign than that and a bigger picture that needs to be looked at….viewed, if you will. 🙂

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5 most interesting things in ad land right now

So what’s been going on recently in our world and yours? Let’s have a look…

Expedia Shares a Powerful Message of Global Togetherness Amid a Divisive Inauguration

Starting off with the biggest news of the week, the year and possibly the century – it’s the inauguration of (*pinches self*) President Trump. Obviously some of the rhetoric up to this point has been pretty divisive. Adweek have highlighted an example, courtesy of Expedia, of how important advertising’s role in countering all of this can become. Check it out by clicking on the link above.

The Dallas Cowboys could be the first NFL team to move into the $890 million e-sports industry

Not content with being the most valuable team in the NFL, the Dallas Cowboys look like they’re now moving into the world of gaming – specifically eSports. It’s a growing industry (almost pushing $1bn a year) and could offer them a fantastic means to engage their fans. Will many other sports teams follow suit? Watch this space….

Report: by end of 2017 there will be more than 30MM voice assistants in US homes

Marketing Land outline how approximately 30 million US homes will be using voice assistants by the end of the year. While applications related to this are struggling to gain traction with users right now, things are expected to improve. Have a look at the link above.

Wal-Mart Enters Car-Selling Business

Wal-Mart appear set to take a chunk out of the car-selling market, partnering up with various dealership groups to make the leap.

The global state of fake news in 5 charts

Fake news was one of the major themes of 2016, and continues to own it’s share of (real and fake) headlines going into 2017. Digiday give a breakdown of the state of things.

How marketing and traditional simplicity won the day for Trump

Continuing with Trump’s victory in the presidential campaign, The Drum present a fantastic article on how he leveraged some old-fashioned thinking regarding branding to come out on top. For a lot of people, his was the right brand, with the right message at the right time – and that is always tough to beat. Check out the article via the link above.

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